Teacher perception and expectation as correlates of student performance in Jamaican New Secondary schools

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1988
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This study sought to explore how teachers' perceptions of themselves as teachers, and their perception and expectation of students in New Secondary schools correlated with students' performance. Data were collected through questionnaires, interviews, and recorded grades of students, using a sample of 360 students and 125 teachers from 15 New Secondary schools in rural, small town, and urban areas. The results of the data analysis revealed: 1) a significant relationship between teacher perception and expectation and student self-concept and academic performance, but no significant relationship between teacher perception and expectation and student vocational performance and sporting activities; 2) a significant relationship between teachers' perceptions of themselves and their schools; 3) no significant difference in teacher perception and expectation according to qualification of teacher and location of school. The specialist trained teachers had a higher perception of themselves than did trained teachers of academic subjects, as well as a higher perception of their schools and their students, and higher expectations for students' performance. Students' vocational performance, however, was not significantly different from their academic performance; 4) no significant difference among students according to school location or perception of their school and their teacher, although students in rural schools perceived their teacher more highly than students in other areas; and 5) a significant difference among students according to school location on performance level in academic and vocational subjects, but not in sports
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