Caribbean Report 18-07-1988

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Caribbean Report 18-07-1988

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Title: Caribbean Report 18-07-1988
Author: Whitehorn, Pat (anchor); Jones, Nick (correspondent); Grant, Bernie (interviewee); MacDuff, Robbie (interviewee); Briley, Harold (correspondent); Crosskill, Hugh (correspondent); Stainer, Martin (analyst); Timmins, Jerry (correspondent); Scott, Martin (interviewee); Barrow, Jim (correspondent)
Description:
1. Headlines: Racism in the House of Commons; British company to search for oil in Guyana; A birthday tribute to Nelson Mandela. (00:07- 00:30)
2. Black workers at the House of Commons in London protest against discrimination and harassment they have suffered inside the House. Their complaints have been taken up by black Labour MP Bernie Grant, who has himself suffered racial discrimination at Westminster. Mr. Grant has lodged a formal protest with the Sergeant-at-arms. BBC political correspondent Nick Jones reports. (00:34 - 03:32)
3. Nearly 200,000 people flock to Hyde Park to pay tribute to jailed South African activist Nelson Mandela on the event of his 70th birthday. The Hyde Park rally is said to be the largest ever to be organized by the anti-apartheid movement. Among the list of speakers were Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Commonwealth Secretary General Shridath “Sonny” Ramphal. (03:36 - 05:46)
4. The British government rejects proposals from the House of Commons Defense Committee to extend its ethnic monitoring of recruits to the British Army. The Committee contends that the monitoring in its present form is too limited, because it only applies to the number of black people entering the forces, and not to how their careers progressed, nor what regimental branch of the armed forces they joined. The BBC’s Pat Whitehorn interviews defense correspondent Harold Briley, and asks why the government refuses to accept the new proposals. Briley notes that the government’s official policy is that there shall be no racial discrimination whatsoever in the forces and they feel that if the government starts monitoring a person’s career in the forces that amounts to racial discrimination. He concedes that such monitoring does take place in the civil service, but the government insists that the armed forces are different. Briley also states that at one point there was racial discrimination in the forces in the form of regimental quotas for blacks, but it was banned by race relations laws. (06:01-08:32)
5. Financial Report: Hugh Crosskill (correspondent), with comments by commodities expert Robin Stainer. (08:40-10:09)
6. After about two years of negotiations, the Government of Guyana is set to sign an agreement to allow a British company to begin offshore oil exploration. The company is the London and Scottish Marine Oil Company, said to be one of Britain’s biggest independent oil producers. BBC correspondent Jerry Timmins interviews Martin Scott, the negotiator for the London and Scottish Marine Oil Company, who notes that any oil find made under the agreement will be of mutual benefit to Guyana as well as the London Scottish Marine Oil Company, since the agreement is a unique, production-sharing agreement. (10:14-12:43)
7. Report on the cricket match between the West Indies’ and Leicestershire, which ended in a draw. This was the final warm up match for the visitors before their upcoming 4th test against England at Headingley. Jim Barrow reports on the match. (12:43 -14:07)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2139/12848
Date: 1988-07-18


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