Caribbean Report 15-07-1988

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Caribbean Report 15-07-1988

Show simple item record

dc.contributor The University of the West Indies en_US
dc.contributor.author Crosskill, Hugh (anchor)
dc.contributor.author Whitehorn, Pat (correspondent)
dc.contributor.author Todd-James, Olive (interviewee)
dc.contributor.author Renton, Ronald Timothy (interviewee)
dc.contributor.author Hann, Colin (interviewee)
dc.contributor.author Morgan, James (correspondent)
dc.contributor.author Bevan, Edward (correspondent)
dc.coverage.spatial Caribbean Area. en_US
dc.creator The British Broadcasting Corporation en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-22T20:02:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-22T20:02:06Z
dc.date.issued 1988-07-15
dc.identifier.other CAR0015 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2139/12845
dc.description.abstract This edition of Caribbean Report highlights several issues related to race relations in Britain. The broad-ranging issues covered include racial profiling and questionable practices in the war against drug trafficking, racial discrimination in the real estate market, assertions that Jesus Christ was black, and even questions regarding race and prowess in some types of athletics and sport, just to name a few. The program ends with highlights of the test match between the West Indies and Glamorgan at Swansea. en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 1. Headlines: Jamaican woman strip-searched at London airport; Firm of London estate agents found guilty of racial bias; Coach Roger Harper happy with West Indies draw with Glamorgan. (00:07-- 00:32) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 2. A Jamaican woman who resides in America was strip-searched and also subjected to a ‘cavity’ search at a London airport. Customs officials claim that she was searched because she was suspected of carrying drugs. The traumatized woman, Olive Todd-James, noted that despite producing a letter from her doctors stating that she had recently undergone abdominal surgery, and the fact that she was menstruating at the time, she still had to undergo an invasive body search. She also claims that she has written several complaint letters, including letters to the Queen and to Margaret Thatcher, and has not received and apology. BBC correspondent Pat Whitehorn also spoke with Timothy Renton, Minister of State at the Home Office regarding the incident. Mr. Renton concluded that customs officials may have had good reason for their actions, and advised that Mrs. Todd-James should ask her Member of Parliament take up the matter. The MP for Tottenham where Mrs. Todd-James’ sister lives has taken up the matter, and has sent a letter to the Prime Minister, requesting a full investigation. (00:38-04:12) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 3. The Richard Barclay Agency, a London firm of real estate agents, has been found guilty of crude racial stereotyping. This has occurred amidst fears that the rapid growth in private sector housing could encourage racial segregation. The Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) found that the agency had refused to show properties to Asians, and quotes one staff member as saying that “Asians are deceitful, neighbours would not like the smell of curry and the agency would lose credibility.” BBC correspondent Hugh Crosskill asks the CRE’s Housing Officer Colin Hann what action would be taken against the agency in light of this finding of guilt. Mr. Hann notes that a non-discrimination notice has been issued against the agency, which means that the CRE would have the right to monitor their activities for five years. It also means that tests would be carried out to determine whether equal treatment is meted out to both black and white people. With the British government changing its housing policy and seeking to sell a lot of its properties to the private sector, Crosskill asks Hann whether he was concerned about this. Hann notes that he was concerned about the private sector’s lack of accountability, and how it could be monitored. He also cited racial harassment as another area of concern. Crosskill asked whether the racial bias was limited to Asians, and Hann replied that it was not. He also noted that the discrimination occurred at the level of the sellers, the owners and the neighbours. (04:20-06:59) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 4. Financial News: Jerry Timmins reports. This segment includes commentary from BBC economic correspondent James Morgan. (07:10-08:48) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 5. Speculation that the Geest group is about to experience a takeover bid, based on a jump in share prices on the stock market where the stock moved from 29p to #2.98. Leonard Van Geest, Managing Director of the company refused to comment on the speculation, stating that there has been no approach, and he knows of no reason for the share movement. (08:53-09:34) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 6. Friday Review of Caribbean-related news in the British press: -- Argument over loud reggae music leads to one man being accidentally stabbed to death, and the other being sentenced to four years imprisonment. Both men were of Caribbean origin. -- Letter writer to the Voice newspaper seeks to let black people know that their history did not start with colonization and slavery. The writer goes on to say that black people made history, and asserts that Jesus Christ was a black man before the Renaissance and only “became” white after the Renaissance. He claims that the Vatican’s historical archives can confirm this. -- The Daily Mail breaks a story of the marriage of multi-million pound heiress Rosanna Coudry to Rastafarian musician Palmer Taylor. The couple are said to have married earlier in the year at an extravagant ceremony in Jamaica. As news spreads about the pending marriage of Rosanna’s sister, the paper is using the news of this new wedding to remind readers that the viscount Coudry has not yet recovered from the shock of Rosanna’s marriage. -- A London evening newspaper asks a soul-searching question in one of its sports pages, “Do we run for our skin or our country?” The writer asks the question after observation that blacks excel over whites in individual performance sports tht require great physical fitness. The writer uses sportsmen like Ben Johnson, Carl Lewis and Jesse Owens to illustrate the point, and also asks why blacks dominate in boxing. He or she contends that running or performing for the colour of your skin may be more important than running for the glory of your country. (09:38-12:44) en_US
dc.description.tableofcontents 7. Sports News. Touring West Indies team had to settle for a draw in their rain-affected match against Glamorgan at Swansea. (Edward Bevan gives a brief commentary). (12:50-14:05) en_US
dc.format Stereo 192 bit rate MP3;44,100 Mega bits;16 bit en_US
dc.format.extent 15 min. 28 sec. en_US
dc.format.medium Sound, mp3 en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The British Broadcasting Corporation en_US
dc.relation.ispartof The BBC Caribbean Archives Collection 1988 - 2011 en_US
dc.rights Copyright British Broadcasting Corporation en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Drug control -- Great Britain. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Racial profiling in law enforcement -- Great Britain. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Race discrimination -- Great Britain. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Great Britain -- Race relations. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Discrimination in housing -- Great Britain. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Test matches (Cricket) -- Great Britain. en_US
dc.title Caribbean Report 15-07-1988 en_US
dc.type Recording, oral en_US
SpecialCollections.repository All sounds files in this collection are being kept at the Main Library, Mona Campus, Jamaica and The Alma Jordan Library, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago. en_US
dc.rights.accessRights Access to this collection is available on site at the Main Library, Mona Campus (main.library@uwimona.edu.jm), Jamaica and The Alma Jordan Library (wimail@sta.uwi.edu), St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago. en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UWISpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account